541.548.7483

Hospice FAQs

1) What is Hospice?
At Hospice of Redmond, we believe that hospice is a choice for patients who have a life-limiting illness and have decided it is time to focus on the quality of their lives. Hospice care is specifically designed for someone who has a referral from a doctor and a terminal diagnosis of 6 months or less to live.

2) How is Hospice paid for?
Hospice services are covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurances.  Families can also choose to private pay for our services.  We ensure no one is turned away because of ability to pay and that everyone has access to a dignified end of life journey free from financial burdens and stress.

3) Should I wait for my physician to initiate a hospice conversation?
One of the most common things we hear from families after being admitted to our care is that they wished they would have sought out our help sooner.  We encourage families to discuss hospice at the first signs of a loved one’s decline.  Talk to your physician, other healthcare providers, and even your clergy and friends or feel free to contact us for a free consultation.  In our experience, families who have had time to understand all their treatment options, to include hospice care, feel more confident and prepared for the future.

4) Where are the patients cared for?
Hospice of Redmond cares for people where they live, wherever you call home.

5) Is all hospice care the same?
Medicare requires certified hospices provide a basic level of care, but the quantity and quality of all services can vary significantly from one hospice to another. Hospice of Redmond been providing individualized, compassionate care to families in this community since 1981 and we pride ourselves on our high level of quality care.

6) Can I go off hospice services?
Of course! At any time during your care, you may opt to seek curative treatments. Also, if your condition improves and the disease seems to be in remission, you may be discharged and return to aggressive therapies or go on about your daily life. If you should later need to return to hospice care, we will be here for you. Hospice of Redmond has a Transitions program that is a free non-medical program that we can support you if you do get off hospice services.

1) What is Hospice?
At Hospice of Redmond, we believe that hospice is a choice for patients who have a life-limiting illness and have decided it is time to focus on the quality of their lives. Hospice care is specifically designed for someone who has a referral from a doctor and a terminal diagnosis of 6 months or less to live.

2) How is Hospice paid for?
Hospice services are covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurances.  Families can also choose to private pay for our services.  We ensure no one is turned away because of ability to pay and that everyone has access to a dignified end of life journey free from financial burdens and stress.

3) Should I wait for my physician to initiate a hospice conversation?
One of the most common things we hear from families after being admitted to our care is that they wished they would have sought out our help sooner.  We encourage families to discuss hospice at the first signs of a loved one’s decline.  Talk to your physician, other healthcare providers, and even your clergy and friends or feel free to contact us for a free consultation.  In our experience, families who have had time to understand all their treatment options, to include hospice care, feel more confident and prepared for the future.

4) Where are the patients cared for?
Hospice of Redmond cares for people where they live, wherever you call home.

5) Is all hospice care the same?
Medicare requires certified hospices provide a basic level of care, but the quantity and quality of all services can vary significantly from one hospice to another. Hospice of Redmond been providing individualized, compassionate care to families in this community since 1981 and we pride ourselves on our high level of quality care.

6) Can I go off hospice services?
Of course! At any time during your care, you may opt to seek curative treatments. Also, if your condition improves and the disease seems to be in remission, you may be discharged and return to aggressive therapies or go on about your daily life. If you should later need to return to hospice care, we will be here for you. Hospice of Redmond has a Transitions program that is a free non-medical program that we can support you if you do get off hospice services.

7) How many friends or family members will it take to care for me at home?
There’s no set number. One of the first things we will do is prepare your individualized Care Plan that will, among other things, address the amount of caregiving you need. Your Care Plan will be routinely reviewed by your Care Team and amended as your needs change. Hospice of Redmond staff is on call 24/7 for your support.

8) Does Hospice of Redmond provide care 24 hours a day, 7 days a week?
Our staff is on call for emergencies 24 hours a day. Hospice care does not include a nurse in the home 24/7. Some of our patients who require more than can be provided in the home are safer and more comfortable in a nursing facility, where we can provide the same hospice services as the in-home patients receive.

9) Does hospice do anything to make death come sooner?
Hospice neither hastens nor postpones dying. Hospice provides its presence and specialized knowledge during the last months of life and through the dying process, enhancing your quality of life for the time you have left.

10) How does hospice “manage pain?”
Our medical director, Dr. David Tretheway, M.D., has been practicing Palliative Care (pain management) with Hospice of Redmond since 1999. We believe that emotional and spiritual pain are just as real and in need of attention as physical pain, so we can address each. Our hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and devices for pain and symptom relief. Counselors, including clergy, are also available to assist you as well as your family.

11) Will medications prevent me from being able to talk or know what’s happening?
Usually not. We work with you to assess your goals in pain management and work to have you as pain-free and alert as possible. By constantly consulting with our patients, we have been very successful at reaching this goal.

12) Is Hospice of Redmond affiliated with any religious organization?
No. Hospice of Redmond is an ecumenical organization that meets you where you are. We celebrate your spirituality and provide spiritual counseling according to your wishes and your faith.

7) How many friends or family members will it take to care for me at home? There’s no set number. One of the first things we will do is prepare your individualized Care Plan that will, among other things, address the amount of caregiving you need. Your Care Plan will be routinely reviewed by your Care Team and amended as your needs change. Hospice of Redmond staff is on call 24/7 for your support.

8) Does Hospice of Redmond provide care 24 hours a day, 7 days a week? Our staff is on call for emergencies 24 hours a day. Hospice care does not include a nurse in the home 24/7. Some of our patients who require more than can be provided in the home are safer and more comfortable in a nursing facility, where we can provide the same hospice services as the in-home patients receive.

9) Does hospice do anything to make death come sooner? Hospice neither hastens nor postpones dying. Hospice provides its presence and specialized knowledge during the last months of life and through the dying process, enhancing your quality of life for the time you have left.

10) How does hospice “manage pain?” Our medical director, Dr. David Tretheway, M.D., has been practicing Palliative Care (pain management) with Hospice of Redmond since 1999. We believe that emotional and spiritual pain are just as real and in need of attention as physical pain, so we can address each. Our hospice nurses and doctors are up to date on the latest medications and devices for pain and symptom relief. Counselors, including clergy, are also available to assist you as well as your family.

11) Will medications prevent me from being able to talk or know what’s happening? Usually not. We work with you to assess your goals in pain management and work to have you as pain-free and alert as possible. By constantly consulting with our patients, we have been very successful at reaching this goal.

12) Is Hospice of Redmond affiliated with any religious organization? No. Hospice of Redmond is an ecumenical organization that meets you where you are. We celebrate your spirituality and provide spiritual counseling according to your wishes and your faith.

Let's Talk

For additional information on hospice care and your eligibility for the program, please call Hospice of Redmond at 541.548.7483.

Myths vs. Facts about Hospice Care

There are many opinions about what Hospice is and isn’t. To learn about the facts about the patient-centered care Hospice provides to seriously ill people, please read below.

Hospice clinicians are specially trained experts in pain control and symptom management. Our team of physicians, nurses, medical social workers, aides and volunteers craft an individualized plan of care for each patient based on that patients and family’s wishes for end of life care.

As the hope for recovery becomes the hope for a life-ending in comfort and dignity, Hospice helps each patient live life with a sense of personal worth in the time remaining to them.

Hospice is only for the last few days or weeks.
Hospice care is for people in the last stages of life, not just for people who are on the verge of death. To be eligible for Hospice services, a patient must have a prognosis of six months or less to live. However, Hospice services provide more benefit to patients and families when they enroll earlier rather than in the final days or weeks of life.

Hospice is expensive.
Hospice care is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance. For patients with no insurance, there is a sliding scale. Once enrolled in Hospice, all patients and families receive the same services including medications and equipment related to the terminal diagnosis and the care from a team of professionals.

A doctor has to make a referral to hospice.
Anyone can request a no-cost, no-obligation evaluation or information visit from hospice, whether the patient resides in a private home or a care facility.

Hospice is only for people with cancer.
Hospice is no longer exclusively for cancer patients. Hospice care is available to all terminally ill people and their families, regardless of diagnosis. Some of the most common non-cancer diagnoses and life-limiting conditions are congestive heart failure, dementia, chronic lung disease, or “debility,” which is simply old age.

Hospice Patients cannot see their own doctors.
Patients receiving Hospice services may continue to be cared for by their own doctor.

Hospice hastens death.
Hospice does nothing to hasten a person’s death or artificially prolong their life. Studies have found that Hospice patients lived longer than those not receiving hospice care.

Hospice is only for the last few days or weeks.
Hospice care is for people in the last stages of life, not just for people who are on the verge of death. To be eligible for Hospice services, a patient must have a prognosis of six months or less to live. However, Hospice services provide more benefit to patients and families when they enroll earlier rather than in the final days or weeks of life.

Hospice is expensive.
Hospice care is paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance. For patients with no insurance, there is a sliding scale. Once enrolled in Hospice, all patients and families receive the same services including medications and equipment related to the terminal diagnosis and the care from a team of professionals.

A doctor has to make a referral to hospice.
Anyone can request a no-cost, no-obligation evaluation or information visit from hospice, whether the patient resides in a private home or a care facility.

Hospice is only for people with cancer.
Hospice is no longer exclusively for cancer patients. Hospice care is available to all terminally ill people and their families, regardless of diagnosis. Some of the most common non-cancer diagnoses and life-limiting conditions are congestive heart failure, dementia, chronic lung disease, or “debility,” which is simply old age.

Hospice Patients cannot see their own doctors.
Patients receiving Hospice services may continue to be cared for by their own doctor.

Hospice hastens death.
Hospice does nothing to hasten a person’s death or artificially prolong their life. Studies have found that Hospice patients lived longer than those not receiving hospice care.

People only receive six months of Hospice care.
Some people worry that if the patient lives longer than six months he or she will be kicked off hospice services. This never happens. If the patient’s prognosis doesn’t change and he or she continues to decline – however slowly – hospice services continue. There is absolutely no penalty if a patient lives longer than the doctor’s prognosis.

Hospice is for people who have “given up.”
When a patient enrolls in Hospice, the goal of care is no longer a “cure,” but rather to maximize the patient’s quality of life based on their choices so that the person may live life as fully as possible for the remaining time available. Hospice does not mean giving up hope, but it can help people revise what they hope for. Hope changes from finding a cure to hope for a peaceful, comfortable death, surrounded by loved ones if they so choose.

Hospice provides 24-hour, around-the-clock care.
Hospice care is provided during regular, intermittent visits, with a nurse available by phone 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If needed, hospice can help the family arrange for a private hire, around-the-clock care attendant.

Hospice is only for the sick family member.
The Hospice care team helps ALL family members and caregivers cope during this time of transition while providing the education they may need to best care for the patient and themselves. Hospice also offers grief support counseling before and after a loved one’s death.

Hospice is a place, so you must leave home to receive hospice care.
Most Hospice care is provided during regular visits wherever the patient calls home – in a private home, nursing or residential care facility. Hospice neither prolongs life with artificial means nor hastens death. We just keep the patient comfortable and let nature take its course.

People only receive six months of Hospice care.
Some people worry that if the patient lives longer than six months he or she will be kicked off hospice services. This never happens. If the patient’s prognosis doesn’t change and he or she continues to decline – however slowly – hospice services continue. There is absolutely no penalty if a patient lives longer than the doctor’s prognosis.

Hospice is for people who have “given up.”
When a patient enrolls in Hospice, the goal of care is no longer a “cure,” but rather to maximize the patient’s quality of life based on their choices so that the person may live life as fully as possible for the remaining time available. Hospice does not mean giving up hope, but it can help people revise what they hope for. Hope changes from finding a cure to hope for a peaceful, comfortable death, surrounded by loved ones if they so choose.

Hospice provides 24-hour, around-the-clock care.
Hospice care is provided during regular, intermittent visits, with a nurse available by phone 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If needed, hospice can help the family arrange for a private hire, around-the-clock care attendant.

Hospice is only for the sick family member.
The Hospice care team helps ALL family members and caregivers cope during this time of transition while providing the education they may need to best care for the patient and themselves. Hospice also offers grief support counseling before and after a loved one’s death.

Hospice is a place, so you must leave home to receive hospice care.
Most Hospice care is provided during regular visits wherever the patient calls home – in a private home, nursing or residential care facility. Hospice neither prolongs life with artificial means nor hastens death. We just keep the patient comfortable and let nature take its course.